October Roundup: Podcasts, Community, and Habit-building

Bats
Boo!

I’ve loved BookRiot for long time, but this month I finally got around to listening to exploring not just their website but their world of podcasts. It really is a world, because they have five and counting as far as I can see. Having just finished reading Everything I Never Told You, I was really excited to check out the interview with her on their Reading Lives podcast. BookRiot’s original podcast is another great show with general news from the world of books and publishing.

Another bookish highlight of this month was getting to participate in Aarti’s #Diversiverse book challenge, where bloggers posted reviews of books by authors of color. I’m still looking forward to browsing through the full list of books that got reviewed and picking out new things for my to-read list. In between these heavy reads I picked up Hyperbole and a Half, a hilarious comic about life that I’ve had on my bookshelf for a while.

In other news, this has been a month of reflection for me on the importance of WOC (women of color) spaces. I started off this year knowing that I wanted to cultivate those spaces in my life and so far I have, with a WOC book club, a writing circle, and a social group. The ripple effects of having these communities in my life isn’t something I can readily explain, but I can say that I’m having a sense of pieces clicking and fitting together in a way that hasn’t happened for me in a few years. It’s like a lattice network going up, and I’m so thankful to be feeling it this month.

Being in a space of building community, getting ready to travel, and in general laying down some new routines and habits in my life, I was super interested when someone in my writing group recommended that I check out Habitica, a computer and mobile tool to help you get done what you want to get done.

Habitica Avatar
Isn’t my avatar cute?

What Habitica does is basically turn your life into a role-playing game. You have an avatar that you get to customize and various types of to-do lists and habits that give you virtual money and accessories when you check off a task. The beauty is that you also lose health points for not completing the tasks you set out to do, or  for indulging in the negative habits you’re trying to get away from. You can use your money to buy equipment and pets for your character, and the game also has a social element of being able to take on challenges in conjunction with other players or join groups.

I was someone who already loved the satisfaction of checking an item off a to-do list, so Habitica has been super useful for me in solidifying my gym-going, my creative writing hour each day, and my getting down to work time. People seem to use Habitica for everything from school and work to creative projects and quitting smoking. We’ll see how it continues to work for me moving forward!

P.S. Adele’s back! Who isn’t excited about that?

September Roundup: Writer Mode and Local Economies

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I love the feeling of fall in the air. Despite the late heat waves here in the Bay Area, I can tell from the orange-brown of the leaves and the new briskness of the air that fall is here, and it’s been inspiring a lot of creative thoughts. I recently joined a writer’s group, which has me easing back into working on the bits and pieces of a novel I have in the workings. Morning time in particular is turning into an especially productive head space for me.

I’ve been watching Gabriela Pereira from DIY MFA on that newfangled app Periscope. This past week she posted one video a day talking about blogging tips for writers. I found it super helpful, and I enjoy a lot of the content on her site and podcast in general.

I also recently picked up Still Writing by Dani Shapiro, which is part memoir and part writing/life advice. Shapiro writes in lovely short passages that contain a lot of little gems like this:

Let go of every should or shouldn’t running through your mind when you start. Be willing to stand at the base of a new mountain, and with humility and grace, bow to it. Allow yourself to understand that it’s bigger than you, or anything you can possibly imagine. You’re not sure of the path. You’re not even sure where the next step will take you. When you begin, whisper to yourself: I don’t know.

On a different note, I’m little thrown right now with the news that Uber is coming into downtown Oakland with two or three thousand employees. Like many cities, Oakland is struggling so much right now with high rents and housing unaffordability on the rise and I’m wondering how a new influx of wealth is going to change the city. I worry about what the move will mean for the cityscape and its race/class politics, and I’m afraid of what it means for the economy that these companies relying on “independent contractors” (rather than decently compensated employees) are proliferating and growing so rapidly.

Lastly, I’ve been thinking a lot recently about sustainable travel. I have a big exciting trip to Asia coming up, but I want to make sure that when I get there I’m respectful of local cultures, customs, environments, and economies as much as possible. I still have a lot to figure out as to what that will mean on the ground, but I want to be thinking about sustainability when choosing where to stay, what to purchase, and how to act while I’m there. I’ll be looking for plenty of advice in the coming months from friends and other folks who have made similar trips!

September Book Finds

Fall has started and while I’m a little sad to be ushering in colder weather soon, I’m also enjoying the change and the freshness to the air that the season of seasons brings. This month I found myself adding a bunch of books to my list of to-reads. Here are a few that I decided to highlight:

Horrorstor: A Novel by Grady Hendrix
This is one of those books that I probably never would have found on my own. But through the network of other book bloggers I encountered this kitchy visual mystery. The format of the book alone and the graphics (modeled after an IKEA catalog) are enough to make me curious about what’s inside.

Hardwiring Happiness: The Practical Science of Reshaping Your Brain–and Your Life by Rick Hanson
Happiness. It’s what we all want, right? And what if that happiness or at least a better sense of well-being is actually something we can move toward with a change in how we think? That’s an idea I’ve held onto as a life philosophy for a while, and I’m curious to see the analysis and suggestions that Hanson has for how to perceive–and live–better.

Fire Shut Up in My Bones by Charles Blow
I read an excerpt from this book somewhere, now I can’t remember where, and I was taken away by the powerful prose that Blow uses to talk about his past. I’m always on the search for memoirs by people of color that diversify the literature of our life experiences, and it seems that this one will definitely fit the bill.